World’s longest cruise sets sail from London

Viking Cruises has just launched its “Ultimate World Cruise” — a 245-day luxury journey aimed at setting the Guinness World Record for the longest continuous passenger cruise.

It’s the stuff of travel dreams — or nightmares depending on how prone you are to sea sickness.

Viking Cruises has just launched its “Ultimate World Cruise,” a 245-day luxury journey aimed at setting the Guinness World Record for the longest continuous passenger cruise.

The 930-guest Viking Sun set sail from London’s Greenwich Pier on August 31. Circumnavigating the globe, it will hit six continents, 51 countries and 111 ports along the way.

The eight-month trip, which will end in London, includes stops in Scandinavia, the Caribbean and destinations throughout South America. Then, the ship will continue on to the islands of the South Pacific, followed by Australia and Asia before it returns to the Mediterranean and Europe.

Along the way, passengers will stay overnight in 23 cities.

The cost for all that globetrotting? Fares start from $92,990 per person, which includes business class airfare, meals and a free excursion in each port of call.

Built in 2017, the Viking Sun is 745 feet in length and offers 10 fine dining venues, including several specialty and alfresco options. All of its 465 staterooms have verandas.

Additional amenities to keep cruisers busy during their 245-day trip include a Nordic-inspired spa, swimming pool, panoramic Explorers’ Lounge, carefully curated libraries and a theater featuring world-class performances.

Ships free of kids and casinos

“For more than 20 years we have been committed to connecting travelers to culturally immersive experiences that allow them to explore the world in comfort,” said Torstein Hagen, chairman of Viking, in a statement.

“Our Ultimate World Cruise is the most extensive itinerary available in the industry, nearly double the length of our previous world cruise itineraries. I am pleased to offer such a unique experience for our guests.”

Viking execs aims to position the Norwegian brand as the “thinking person’s cruise,” providing an alternative to mainstream cruises.

For instance, guests can take in world-class guest lectures from experts, including “everyone from authors and archaeologists to former diplomats and news correspondents.” There are also resident historians and TED Talk screenings.

What you won’t find on a Viking ship are casinos or kids (cruises are limited to passengers 18 or older).

It appears travelers aren’t missing either. Viking Ocean Cruises pulled in 10 first-place awards in the 9th annual Cruise Critic Cruisers’ Choice Awards in May. The brand’s long-established river cruise line also earned top honors, with Viking Vidar named best for river cruises.

But it hasn’t been entirely smooth sailing this year. In May, the company hit headlines when its Viking Sky cruise ship was left adrift in stormy Norwegian seas due to engine trouble. Rescue teams had to airlift 479 people from the ship, which had 1,300 passengers and crew on board.

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