How Oliver joined the Yager family

NEW ORLEANS -- November is National Adoption Month. And, the decision to adopt is a big one.

For Alycee Yager, her decision to become an adoptive parent came after one of the toughest moments in her life. WGNO's Teaching Doctor, Dr. Rachel, spoke with Alycee about how Oliver joined her family.

"Just going to an annual OB-GYN in 2013 to talk about fertility. getting married, and wanted to get pregnant," remembers Alycee. "And, they found something."

Her doctors found breast cancer. Extensive surgery and chemotherapy followed. Then, more bad news.

"Chemotherapy turned into, 'Oh, you're probably not going to be able to have another child,'" says Alycee. "And, honestly, I think that upset me more then the actual breast cancer."

She and her husband Teddy Yager had been planning to get married and were hoping to grow their family.

"Just a freak derailment of the little things we thought we had control over, you know," says Teddy. "It just came out of nowhere."

As a nurse at Touro Infirmary, Alycee already spends a lot of time around babies. Since she and her husband were not ready to give up on their dream to have more children, a co-worker suggested fostering.

"I think maybe this is my calling. This is why I couldn't get pregnant," says Alycee. "So, we kind of went with the process."

When the process was over and they got their certification, a call came in with a baby at Touro who needed fostering. The baby was Oliver. And they didn't hesitate to say yes.

Alycee works in the nursery and NICU at Touro, but had never taken care of Oliver or even knew he was there.

"It was like he was meant to be here," says Teddy. "Within an hour of just having serious time with him. You know it's amazing."

Fostering turned into adoption. And, Oliver joined Alycee, Teddy, and his new big brother Mason to make one happy and growing family.

On the day of the adoption, Alycee says the the judge asked if she would care for Oliver as she did with her first child, Mason.

"I'm like, well, of course," she recalls. "Blood, you know, that's nothing."