Toilet seats, umbrellas, flip flops: watch them take a big bite as a SHARK

NEW ORLEANS -  It's a creation of stuff that washed up on beaches.  Most of it comes from beaches on the Pacific Coast.

WGNO News with a Twist features guy Wild Bill Wood is at the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas in New Orleans, Louisiana where the trash has turned into treasure.

The treasure looks like animals that come out of the water.

They're sculptures made from plastic trash collected from beaches.  The goal is to give all of us a lesson in how plastic pollution threatens the ecosystems of our planet's oceans and waterways.

You can see it for yourself.  It's called “Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea".

The sculptures are making their way around America.  It's a traveling show and tell kind of show.

What will you see?

A Sea Jelly ten-feet long.

And a Marlin who's also ten-feet long. The Marlin has a name.  He is Flash.

And there's a Great White Shark named  Greta who weighs in at 1,500 pounds.

Angela Haseltine Pozzi is the artist who put together these animals from the sea.

She says, " we hope to convey the powerful message about how our everyday choices affect plastic pollution in the ocean and waterways and do it in a way that will engage all ages."

Washed Ashore is not-for-profit.  It started in 2010 after Angela saw mountains of plastic trash piling up on the beaches of her home state of Oregon.

She's gotten a lot of help in the project.  More than 10,000 volunteers have helped by collecting, washing and hand sewing parts of sculptures.

Wonder how much stuff has been used?

Well, more than 42,000 pounds of plastic pollution have been collected from more than 300 miles of beaches.

And with all that former trash, they turned into more than 70 sculptures that tour the country.

The sea creatures will be at the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas until April 2019.

When you buy a ticket to the aquarium, you get to see the sea creatures as part of the deal.