Hometown Haunts: Jacques Saint-Germain, N.O.’s very own vampire

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NEW ORLEANS -- What do you make of a man who's said to have been around for centuries? One of the most mysterious creatures that roams our streets New Orleans' very own vampire, the Count de Saint-Germain.

He's known as the Comte St Germain, the Count of Saint Germain, the Count of Rákóczi, and by many other aliases. And his tale is one of history's most tantalizing mysteries.  Records indicate that this man was born in the late 1600s, but reports by historical figures have told of a similar man that can be traced back to the time of Christ.

In 1904, a man matching St Germain's physical description with a very similar name, Jacques St. Germain, was living in a house at Ursulines Avenue and Royal Streets. He was known for hosting elaborate parties in his house, where he was never seen to eat or drink any of the catered meals that he provided for his guests.

One night in November, a woman jumped off of the second story balcony. She claimed that she was a prostitute and that Jacques St. Germaine had attacked her. She told the police that Jacques dragged a knife across her skin and tried to drink her blood.

The police did not want to believe the word of a prostitute, so they went to St. Germain for his statement. When the police returned to the home, St. Germain was gone - never to return. When the police searched his house they found some mysterious things, blood stains under carpets, no food to be found anywhere on the property and wine bottles and glasses filled with blood.

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