Museum of Death: Can you handle it?

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NEW ORLEANS (WGNO)-- The Museum of Death is not for the faint of heart.  It opened in Hollywood 20 years ago and now there's a second location in the French Quarter.  It's a place that will make you glad you're alive while your eyes proceed with caution.

"A lot of people might not be prepared for what they're going to see when they come to the museum of death," says owner James Healy.

But what you see is fascinating:

  • Who can forget O.J. Simpson's criminal trial for the murder's of Ronald Goldman and Nicole Brown Simpson?  On display is a piece of her hair and her dog's bowl from the crime scene.
  • Dozens of extremely rare jailhouse letters from Jeffrey Dahmer, who murdered and dismembered 17 men and boys.
  • A license plate from Spahn Ranch, where criminal Charles Manson and his family lived.
  • Jack Kevorkian's suicide machine, the doctor who helped dozens of terminally ill people end their lives.
  • A business card belonging to Jack Ruby, who killed JKF's alleged assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald.

All interesting but tame compared to the exhibits we can't show you on camera.

"We like to call the people who faint here are falling down ovations. We get about two every month and if you faint in the museum of death we give you a free t-shirt," says Healy.

The museum isn't just for shock value, it's educational.

"We take away the stigma of people being afraid of dying. I think in our culture we don't talk about death until its too late," says Healy.

The Museum of Death will have its grand opening June 1, 2015.  On that day, if you mention "WGNO," you can get $10 off your $15 admission.

Google Map for coordinates 29.956033 by -90.069792.

The Museum of Death is located at 227 Dauphine St. New Orleans, LA 70112

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