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(CNN) — Two U.S. citizens who were kidnapped from an oilfield supply ship off Nigeria’s coast last month have been released, U.S. State Department spokeswoman Jennifer Psaki confirmed Tuesday.

News of the release comes nearly three weeks after armed men stormed the 221-foot U.S.-flagged C-Retriever and kidnapped the two Americans, identified at the time by U.S. and Nigerian officials as the captain and a chief engineer.

The ship, owned by Louisiana-based Edison Chouest Offshore, was attacked October 23 in the piracy-plagued Gulf of Guinea off Nigeria.

Psaki said Tuesday she would not comment further about the Americans due to privacy concerns.

The oil-rich area off the coast of West Africa has increasingly drawn international attention as a piracy hotspot, with 40 pirate attacks reported in the first nine months of 2013, the International Maritime Bureau reported.

PSV C-Retriever Ship

Two mariners believed to be U.S. citizens have been taken from their U.S.-flagged ship following a pirate attack in the West African Gulf of Guinea, a U.S. official confirmed Thursday, October 24, 2013. The attack on the oil platform supply vessel C-Retriever happened Wednesday off the coast of Brass, Nigeria. Two crew members — the captain and chief engineer — were taken off the ship, the U.S. official said.

(CNN) — The Nigerian navy has yet to find two U.S. citizens kidnapped from an oilfield supply ship attacked this week in the piracy-plagued Gulf of Guinea off Africa’s western coast, a spokesman said Friday.

Both the crew members and the 221-foot oilfield supply ship C-Retriever remained missing amid a search-and-rescue effort led by the Nigerian navy, spokesman Kabir Aliyu, told CNN on Friday.

Aliyu vowed that Nigerian forces would “bring the criminals to justice.”

The Nigerian navy said Thursday that it would try to rescue the kidnapped mariners — the captain and chief engineer of the vessel. But it was unclear if anyone other than their captors know where the two were taken after their seizure Wednesday.

It is not uncommon for pirates to seize merchant crewmen for ransom, but it is unclear whether that was the scenario playing out Friday.

U.S. officials last talked about the situation Thursday, when State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said the administration was “seeking additional information about the incident so that we may contribute to safely resolving the situation.”

“Obviously our concern at this point is for the safe return of the two U.S. citizens,” she said.

Louisiana-based Edison Chouest Offshore, which owns the vessel, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The gulf, a vast expanse of water increasingly plied by pirates, is extremely dangerous, said Don Marcus, president of the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots.

“They’re out for anything they can get their hands on,” Marcus said of the pirates. “Cargo theft is a big part of it, be it machinery, supplies, be it the actual fuel, be it prisoners that they take ashore and hold for ransom, kidnapping essentially. They’re looking for money.”

And slow-moving vessels that service oil platforms are more vulnerable to attacks than cargo ships traveling off the coast of Somalia, another area that’s drawn attention for maritime piracy, he said.

The Gulf of Guinea produces about 5.4 million barrels of oil a day, according to London-based think tank Chatham House. And about 30% of U.S. oil imports flow through the region, according to International Crisis Group.

The oil-rich area off the coast of West Africa has increasingly drawn international attention as a piracy hotspot, with 40 pirate attacks reported in the first nine months of 2013, the International Maritime Bureau reported.

It also has been the site of the only ship crew kidnappings worldwide this year, with 132 crew members taken hostage.

Seven ships have been hijacked, the organization said.

Piracy in the Gulf of Guinea accounted for 30% of the 1,434 reported piracy attacks in African waters between 2003 and 2011, and the pace of attacks has risen since then, Chatham House reported in March.

The think tank reported 62 pirate attacks in the gulf in 2012, up from 39 in 2010. It says that’s partially because Western navies have cracked down on piracy off the coast of Somalia, on the other side of the continent.

U.S. Marines are in the region aboard a Dutch ship off West Africa. Military forces from the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, the Netherlands and five African nations recently held exercises in the region that were designed to strengthen maritime security, according to the U.S. Navy.

It was unclear, however, if Western forces planned any response to Wednesday’s attack.

CNN’s Vladimir Duthiers contributed to this report.

As U.S. Military forces work to rescue crew members abducted from a ship in the African Gulf of Guinea during a pirate attack, some Louisiana offshore workers are holding out hope for their safe return.

WGNO News Reporter Darian Trotter spoke to residents in Cut Off;  where the company that owns the ship is located.

“I’m hoping some kind of action will be taken immediately,” off shore worker Jason Foley said.

There’s deep concern in Cut Off for U.S. Citizens abducted from their ship in a pirate attack in the West African Gulf of Guinea.

Trotter asked, “What do you think that must have been like for them? Probably pretty traumatic, obviously yeah,” Foley replied.

It happened Wednesday, on-board an oil platform supply vessel C-Retriever off the coast of Brass, Nigeria.

Authorities say the captain, chief engineer, and two crew members were taken off the ship.

ChouestThe C-Retriever is owned by Edison Chouest Offshore, which is based in Cut Off, Louisiana; a community with generations of oil platform workers.

Trotter asked, “You say what? It’s really crazy because I have an uncle who’s a captain for Chouest,” neighbor Julia Jambon said.

It’s a way of life in Cut Off that comes with real-life concerns.

The International Maritime Bureau reports the oil-rich gulf is a piracy hot-spot, with 40-pirate attacks this year alone.

Trotter asked, “What are people saying? People that go out there pretty much know what they’re dealing with and that’s what everyone’s saying,” Foley replied. “You know what to expect when you go over there.”

U.S. Maritime and military forces are in the region.

Meantime, back in Cut Off there are well wishes for the captives.

Trotter asked, “What is your hope for them as they go through this very trying time?” “That they find them safe,” Jambon replied.

Trotter asked Foley, “No one knows where they are, their condition?” “I’m hoping for the government to take action immediately,” he replied.

The conditions and whereabouts of the hostages are still unknown.

Late Thursday night, Edison Chouest Offshore had made no comment about the incident.

PSV C-Retriever Ship

Two mariners believed to be U.S. citizens have been taken from their U.S.-flagged ship following a pirate attack in the West African Gulf of Guinea, a U.S. official confirmed Thursday, October 24, 2013. The attack on the oil platform supply vessel C-Retriever happened Wednesday off the coast of Brass, Nigeria. Two crew members — the captain and chief engineer — were taken off the ship, the U.S. official said. Courtesy Christian Serrano.

(CNN) — Two mariners believed to be U.S. citizens have been taken from their U.S.-flagged ship following a pirate attack in the West African Gulf of Guinea, a U.S. official confirmed Thursday.

The attack on the oil platform supply vessel C-Retriever happened Wednesday off the coast of Brass, Nigeria. Two crew members — the captain and chief engineer — were taken off the ship, the U.S. official said.

Further details on Wednesday’s attack, including the well-being of the two crew members or the condition of their ship, were not immediately available.

The C-Retriever is owned by Edison Chouest Offshore, which is based in Cut Off, LA in Lafourche Parish..

The oil-rich gulf has increasingly drawn international attention as a piracy hotspot, with 40 pirate attacks reported in the first nine months of 2013, the International Maritime Bureau reported.

It also has been the site of the only ship crew kidnappings worldwide this year, with 132 crew members taken hostage.

Seven ships have been hijacked, the organization said.

Piracy in the Gulf of Guinea accounted for 30% of the 1,434 reported piracy attacks in African waters between 2003 and 2011 and the pace of attacks has risen since then, London-based think tank Chatham House reported in March.

Chatham House reported 62 pirate attacks in the gulf in 2012, up from 39 in 2010.

The increase is in part due, the think tank said, to aggressive anti-piracy efforts by Western navies off the coast of Somalia, on the east side of the continent.

U.S. Marines are currently in the region aboard a Dutch ship off West Africa. Military forces from the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, the Netherlands and five African nations recently held exercises in the region designed to strengthen maritime security, according to the U.S. Navy.

The gulf produces some 5.4 million barrels of oil a day, according to Chatham House. Some 30% of U.S. oil imports flow through the region, according to International Crisis Group.

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