Story Summary

Boston Marathon bombing

One of the first explosion photos from the scene, credit Dan Lampariello.

One of the first explosion photos from the scene, credit Dan Lampariello.

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Boston Suspect Search

The police stayed on our street with armored cars for two hours that morning and the checked our backyards a few times and then they left, and now I can see just some police presence

(CNN) – Handguns, a rifle and at least six bombs — three of which exploded — were found at the scene early Friday after officers first confronted the two Boston Marathon bombing suspects in the darkness of a residential street, the Watertown, Massachusetts, police chief told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer on Saturday.

A single officer was the first to encounter the two cars that Tamerlan and Dzhokar Tsarnaev were driving, just before 1 a.m. Friday, Chief Edward Deveau said.

Before the officer could get backup, the two cars stopped, and the brothers got out.

“They jump out of the car and unload on our police officer,” Deveau said “They both came out shooting — shooting guns, handguns. He’s under direct fire, very close by. He has to jam it in reverse and try to get himself a little distance.”

Five other police officers, including two who had just finished their shifts, then arrived at what Deveau called a “very tight area” in the middle of an intense shootout. One of the officers was wounded.

“We estimate there was over 200 shots fired in a five- to 10-minute period,” Deveau said.

One of the brothers threw an explosive at the officers. They later discovered it was a pressure cooker bomb, similar to the ones used at the marathon Monday, the chief said.

“There was one here in New Orleans.  Never made the papers,” said Jim Bernazzani, the former Special Agent in Charge for the FBI office in New Orleans.

Bernazzani spent 24 years working to fight terrorism.  He didn’t give too many specifics on the terror cell that was identified and neutralized in New Orleans, but he said the suspects did a pretty good job of blending in.

“They were affiliates of a terror organization.  They were undercover as students at local area universities,” he said.

Investigative work helped crack the New Orleans case.  Bernazzani says beating terrorism also required help from everyday people.  It’s the kind of help police and FBI agents in Boston received Friday when someone noticed blood on a boat in storage.  The person called police who found the second Boston Marathon suspect hiding under the boat’s cover.

Bernazzani says going into Friday night’s search, FBI agents wanted to make sure nobody else got hurt by the suspects.  But he says agents also had one more important marching order.

“Take this guy alive, the 19-year-old.  He is a treasure trove of intelligence.”

That’s exactly what happened, and the second suspect, at last word, was undergoing treatment at a Boston hospital.

Bernazzani says, even the smallest detail could provide a big break for police.  He says it could be the missing piece of a puzzle that’s already being worked.

“If you get that missing piece, then good people win.”

Tulane University officials are working to minimize the impact events near Boston may have on students.

This week got off to a traumatic start  when two bombs exploded at the finish of the Boston Marathon, killing three and injuring more than one-hundred others.

Just days later, massive gunfire at MIT resulted in an officer’s death and one of two suspects in the marathon bombings.

“People from Boston obviously you have to sympathize with them,” said Tulane University student Matt Foreman said.

Even though the terror happened hundreds of miles away the effects are far reaching.

captureThese Tulane University students say especially for those with ties to Boston.

“It’s just tough being here while stuff is going on at home for them.” Foreman said. “So their kind on their toes and just not sure what to do.”

“There’s no doubt that those students who are from Boston who grew up there are going to take it harder because they are looking at the faces, the people,” University Professor Charles Figley said. “They listen to their accents, they see the familiar places.”

And that’s not all.

Dr. Charles Figley is a trauma expert at Tulane University’s School of Social Work.

He says history has shown acts of terrorism can cause anxiety among students who share, for example, ethnic ties to the accused.

They may become fearful of profiling and unjustified retaliation; similar to what the nation witnessed after 9-11.

“There is this hostility that is automatic because people need to discharge anger,”  Figley said.

There’s been no reports of trouble on campus, or around town; but Figley says we may not have seen the worst, because the greater community is still taking in the events of the week.

The post traumatic reaction is days away.

His best advice to anyway struggling to work through this trying time is not to go it alone.

“And that is to be willing to reach out to other people they trust at least minimally; to talk about their fears, talk about their concern, their confusion,”  Figley said.

Figley says this degree of stress can adversely affect students preparing for final exams.

Earlier University President Scott Cowen send words of encouragement to students in a form of an email.

Cowen said, “We know that a few members of our Tulane community were at the Marathon, but thankfully they were not physically injured.” “We continue to assess whether the explosions impacted any Tulanians and, if so, how we might assist them.” Please let us know if someone needs our help.”

Counselors are available to any student who needs help.

capture(CNN) — Developments in the Boston Marathon bombings investigation have come quickly since the release of photos of the suspects.

Thursday

5 p.m. ET: The FBI releases pictures of two male suspects being sought in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings.

Late Thursday: A robbery is reported at a convenience store. Massachusetts State Police spokesman Col. Timothy Alben initially said the two bombing suspects robbed the store. But he later backtracked, saying the two men didn’t rob a store.

11 p.m.: Police respond to a call on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where university police officer Sean Collier, 26, was shot. He died from his injuries. Police believe the bombing suspects were responsible for the shooting.

Friday

Early hours: Police say the two suspects hijack a car at gunpoint in Cambridge, Massachusetts, taking the driver as a hostage. The suspects tell the driver they are the Boston marathon bombers, a law enforcement source told CNN’s Joe Johns.

Early hours: The hostage is released at a gas station.

Early hours: At one point, the suspects pull over to transfer materials into their new car, two federal officials said.

1 a.m.: Police, who were tracking the vehicle using its built-in GPS system, pick up the chase in Watertown. The pursuit goes into a residential neighborhood, with the suspects throwing explosives and firing shots at officers, police said.

The suspects threw one grenade and five pipe bombs at police chasing them, one FBI and one Department of Homeland Security official told CNN. Three of those explosives detonated, two did not, the officials said.

Officers fire back, with Gov. Deval Patrick later estimating that 200 rounds of gunfire were exchanged in the firefight.

One suspect is hit and run over by the driver of the car he had been in. He is later identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, and pronounced dead at the hospital. A source briefed on the investigation says Tamerlan Tsarnaev was wearing explosives and an explosive trigger at the time. After he is shot, his brother runs over him as he drives away, according to the source.

Transit officer Richard H. Donohue Jr., a 33-year veteran of the force, is shot and wounded in the Watertown exchange. Fifteen police officers are treated at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in nearby Brighton for injuries suffered in the episode, according to hospital spokeswoman Jennifer Kovalich.

Authorities later announce that they recovered a pressure-cooker bomb after the pursuit into Watertown, a source briefed on the ongoing investigation said. They also recovered a significant amount of homemade explosives in Watertown, Massachusetts State Police spokesman David Procopio said.

2 a.m.: Police begin ordering residents in Watertown to turn off their cell phones.

7 a.m.: At least 12 universities and colleges, along with Boston Public Schools and Cambridge Public Schools, announce that they will be closed for the day because of police activity.

8 a.m.: Sources identify the dead suspect as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and the suspect on the run as his brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19.

8 a.m.: Boston-area residents are asked by authorities to stay inside as the hunt continues for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

9 a.m.: The slain suspect, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was wearing explosives and an explosive trigger when his body was recovered, a source briefed on the investigation tells CNN.

All day: Hundreds of law enforcement officers go door-to-door on 20 streets in Watertown, looking for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Alben, the state police spokesman, says the suspect fled on foot and that authorities still believe he’s in Massachusetts.

11:30 a.m.: The uncle of the Tsarnaev brothers tells reporters that he is “ashamed” to be related to the suspects, whom he calls “losers.” Speaking outside of his Montgomery County, Maryland, home, Ruslan Tsarni says that his nephew Dzhokhar Tsarnaev “has put a shame on our family, a shame on the entire ethnicity” and should turn himself in.”

12:20 p.m.: The University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth is evacuated, and the school says that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was an enrolled student. Law enforcement personnel swarm the campus, which is just west of New Bedford and about 60 miles south of Boston.

3:15 p.m.: Numerous activities scheduled for Friday night are canceled around Boston — including Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games, as well as a Big Apple Circus show — because of the ongoing manhunt for the marathon bombing suspect.

6 p.m. The lockdown for the Boston area is lifted, meaning people can again leave their homes, even though a suspect remains at large. The area’s public transit system, known as the T, also returns to service after being shut down most of the day, the governor said.

Massachusetts State Police will run additional patrols through Watertown to help police in that city, for at least the next few days or until Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is caught or killed, said Alben.

6:30 p.m.: Interpol issues an “international security alert” related to the marathon bombings, asking its 190 member countries to look for information tied to the case and, specifically, information about bombs similar to those used in the attack. The international law enforcement agency’s Orange Notice includes photographs of the bombs used on Monday and fingerprints of the two suspects.

7:30 p.m.: A senior federal law enforcement official says authorities in Watertown, Massachusetts, have engaged the possible remaining suspect in the marathon bombings.

7:45 p.m.: As many as a dozen people were moved away from the scene of intense police activity in Watertown, Massachusetts, including a young girl being carried in a police officer’s arms. There was a large police presence and a helicopter flying overhead. Witnesses said they’d heard about 20 gunshots fired.

8:00 p.m.: There are multiple explosions near where authorities have engaged the possible suspects.

8:15 p.m.: A person believed to be Dzhokar Tsarnaev is cornered on a boat in a yard in Watertown, Massachusetts, law enforcement officials say.

8:30 p.m.: Law enforcement officials make a number of appeals to the person apparently inside the boat: “Come out on your own terms”; “We know you’re in there” and “Come out with your hands up.”

8:35 p.m.: While executing a search warrant in New Bedford, Massachusetts, at a residence believed to have been affiliated with Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the FBI takes three people — two males and a female — into custody for questioning Friday evening, according to New Bedford Police Lt. Robert Richard. The residence searched by the FBI is private off-campus housing for UMass Dartmouth students, Richard said.

8:43 p.m.: Police in Watertown, Massachusetts, break out in cheers, shouting “Yay!” A crowd of neighbors also cheer.

8:46 p.m.: The Boston Police Department tweets: “Suspect in custody. Officers sweeping the area. Stand by for further info.”

CNN’s Brian Todd, Jason Carroll, Adam Levine, Jason Kessler and Wayne Drash contributed to this report

capture(CNN) — The suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings is in custody, Boston police tweeted.

capture

(CNN) — Police have cornered a man believed to be the suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings on a boat in a yard in a suburb of the Massachusetts capital, law enforcement officials told CNN.

Authorities “engaged” the man, according to one of the officials who spoke on condition of anonymity, just minutes after authorities indicated a massive manhunt for a suspect in Watertown appeared to come up empty.

A CNN crew near the scene heard about two dozen gunshots fired, but it was not clear if the shots were fired by the suspect, authorities or both. A number of small explosions, believed to be stun grenades, also were heard.

Authorities, using a bullhorn, called on the suspect to surrender: “Come out with your hands up.”

The development came after authorities cast a wide net for the suspect that virtually shut down the Massachusetts capital amid warnings the man was possibly armed with explosives.

Authorities say Dzhokar Tsarnaev escaped an overnight shootout with police in suburban Watertown that left his older brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev — the other man wanted in the bombings — dead.

More than 18 hours after the search focused on the younger brother, police officers in full body armor, carrying automatic weapons wrapped up their door-to-door search of the area, Col. Timothy Alben of the Massachusetts State Police said.

“Unfortunately, we don’t have a positive result at this point,” Alben said at the time.

“We think he’s still in Massachusetts.”

Gov. Deval Patrick, meanwhile, lifted an order that confined an estimated one million residents to their homes, urging people to “remain vigilant.”

Bombing connection

The violence and subsequent manhunt began late Thursday just hours after the FBI released photos of the two suspects in the marathon bombings.

“Investigators are recovering a significant amount of homemade explosives” from the scene of the shootout, Massachusetts State Police spokesman David Procopio told CNN.

It was not immediately clear what explosives were recovered, but the discovery followed a tense night in which authorities say the brothers allegedly hurled explosives at pursuers after killing an officer and hijacking a car.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was wearing explosives and a triggering device when he died, a source briefed on the investigation told CNN on condition of anonymity.

The search followed a violent night in which authorities say the two men allegedly hurled explosives at pursuers after killing Massachusetts Institute of Technology police Officer Sean Collier and hijacked a car.

With more than 200 rounds of ammunition and a number of explosives thrown during the chase and gunbattle, Patrick said the lockdown was necessary.

The manhunt brought Boston and its surrounds to a near standstill. The Boston Red Sox announced they were postponing Friday night’s game against the Kansas City Royals “to support efforts of law enforcement officers.” NHL’s Boston Bruins also postponed its game against the Pittsburgh Penguins.

The city’s subway, bus, Amtrak train and Greyhound and regional Bolt Bus services were shut down. Taxi service across the city also was suspended for a time during the manhunt. Every Boston area school was closed.

Boston’s public transit authority sent city buses to Watertown to evacuate residents while bomb experts combed the surroundings for possible explosives.

Initially, authorities said the brothers started their rampage by robbing a convenience store. By late Friday, the Middlesex District Attorney’s office backtracked on the allegation, saying an investigation determined that the robbery at a 7-Eleven was unrelated.

Officer killed

In Cambridge, across the Charles River from Boston, MIT officer Collier was shot and killed while he sat in his car, the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office said in a statement.

The two suspects, according to authorities, then hijacked a vehicle at gunpoint in Cambridge, telling the driver that they were the marathon bombers, a law enforcement source told CNN on condition of anonymity.

At some point, apparently at a gas station, that source said, the driver escaped.

Police, who were tracking the vehicle using its built-in GPS system, picked up the chase in Watertown. The pursuit went into a residential neighborhood, with the suspects throwing explosives at police.

A shootout erupted and ultimately one bomber — later identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev — got out of the car. Police shot him, and his brother ran over him as he drove away, according to the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Richard H. Donohue Jr., 33, a three-year veteran of the transit system police force, was shot and wounded in the incident and taken to a hospital, a transit police spokesman said Friday. The officer’s condition was not immediately known.

Another 15 police officers were treated for minor injuries sustained during the explosions and shootout, Jennifer Kovalich, a spokeswoman for St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center, said.

Suspects background

Police believe the brothers are the same men pictured in images released Thursday by the FBI as suspects in the marathon bombing that killed three people and wounded dozens on Monday.

The men are shown in the images walking together near the marathon finish line.

The first suspect — apparently Tamerlan Tsarnaev, according to authorities — appears in the images wearing a dark hat, sunglasses and a backpack. The second suspect, wearing a white cap, is the one who remains at large, police said.

But the mother of the Tsarnaev brothers refused to believe they were involved in the marathon bombings and subsequent shootout.

“It’s impossible for them to do such things. I am really telling you that this is a setup,” Zubeidat Tsarnaeva told state-run Russia Today from Dagestan.

“My son would never keep it in secret. …If there is anyone who would know it would be me. He wouldn’t hide it. But there was never a word.”

The brothers came from the Russian Caucasus region and moved to Kazakhstan at a young age before coming to the United States several years ago.

“My youngest was raised from 8 years in America. My oldest was really properly raised in our house. Nobody talked about terrorism,” their mother said.

The suspects’ parents recently returned to Dagestan in the Caucasus region after living in the United States for about 10 years because they were “nostalgic,” the father, Anzor Tsarnaev, told Russian state-run Zvezda TV.

He accused someone of framing his sons. “I don’t know who exactly did it. But someone did.”

A federal official told CNN that Dzhokar Tsarnaev came to the U.S. as a tourist with his family in the early 2000s and later asked for asylum. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 2012. Tamerlan Tsarnaev was not a naturalized citizen, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. He came “a few years later” and was lawfully in the United States as a green-card holder.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev had studied at Bunker Hill Community College and wanted to become an engineer, according to those who knew him. He then took a year off to train as a boxer.

‘I don’t understand them’

The official said that a posting on a social media site in the elder brother’s name included the comments: “I don’t have a single American friend. I don’t understand them.”

Dzhokar Tsarnaev attended Cambridge Rindge & Latin, a public high school, said Eric Mercado, who graduated a year behind the suspect. Mercado said Tsarnaev had worked at Harvard University as a lifeguard.

“We hung out; we partied; we were good high school friends,” Mercado told CNN.

“We’re all, like, in shock. We don’t really understand. There were no telltale signs of any kind of malicious behavior from Dzhokar. It’s all coming as a shock, really.”

Mercado said he lived a block away from the suspect and did not know his older brother.

Dzhokar Tsarnaev is currently registered as a student at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, which ordered its campus evacuated on Friday. The school is located 65 miles south of Cambridge, just west of New Bedford.

Larry Aaronson, Dzhokar Tsarnaev’s neighbor and a former teacher at the high school Tsarnaev attended, called him a “wonderful kid.”

“He was so grateful to be here, he was compassionate, he was caring, he was jovial,” Aaronson told CNN.

CNN’s John King, Joe Johns, Chris Lawrence, Deborah Feyerick, Ben Brumfield, Jake Tapper and Drew Griffin contributed to this report.

capture(CNN) — The Boston Police Department tweeted that there are “police operations” on Franklin Street in Watertown, Massachusetts. CNN crew at the scene heard gunshots and saw several law enforcement vehicles race toward the scene.

Boston Suspect Search

The police stayed on our street with armored cars for two hours that morning and the checked our backyards a few times and then they left, and now I can see just some police presence

(CNN) — A massive manhunt for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings appeared to come up empty Friday despite a wide net cast by authorities that virtually shut down the Massachusetts capital amid warnings the man was possibly armed with explosives.

Authorities say Dzhokar Tsarnaev escaped an overnight shootout with police in suburban Watertown that left his older brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev — the other man wanted in the bombings — dead.

More than 18 hours after the search focused on the younger brother, police officers in full body armor, carrying automatic weapons wrapped up their door-to-door search of the area, Col. Timothy Alben of the Massachusetts State Police said.

“Unfortunately, we don’t have a positive result at this point,” he said.

“We think he’s still in Massachusetts.”

Gov. Deval Patrick, meanwhile, lifted an order that confined an estimated one million residents to their homes, urging people to “remain vigilant.”

Bombing connection

The violence and subsequent manhunt began late Thursday just hours after the FBI released photos of the two suspects in the marathon bombings.

“Investigators are recovering a significant amount of homemade explosives” from the scene of the shootout, Massachusetts State Police spokesman David Procopio told CNN.

It was not immediately clear what explosives were recovered, but the discovery followed a tense night in which authorities say the brothers allegedly hurled explosives at pursuers after killing an officer and hijacking a car.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was wearing explosives and a triggering device when he died, a source briefed on the investigation told CNN on condition of anonymity.

The search followed a violent night in which authorities say the two men allegedly hurled explosives at pursuers after killing Massachusetts Institute of Technology police Officer Sean Collier and hijacked a car.

With more than 200 rounds of ammunition and a number of explosives thrown during the chase and gunbattle, Patrick said the lockdown was necessary.

The manhunt brought Boston and its surrounds to a near standstill. The Boston Red Sox announced they were postponing Friday night’s game against the Kansas City Royals “to support efforts of law enforcement officers.” NHL’s Boston Bruins also postponed its game against the Pittsburgh Penguins.

The city’s subway, bus, Amtrak train and Greyhound and regional Bolt Bus services were shut down. Taxi service across the city also was suspended for a time during the manhunt. Every Boston area school was closed.

Boston’s public transit authority sent city buses to Watertown to evacuate residents while bomb experts combed the surroundings for possible explosives.

Initially, authorities said the brothers started their rampage by robbing a convenience store. By late Friday, the Middlesex District Attorney’s office backtracked on the allegation, saying an investigation determined that the robbery at a 7-Eleven was unrelated.

Officer killed

In Cambridge, across the Charles River from Boston, MIT officer Collier was shot and killed while he sat in his car, the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office said in a statement.

The two suspects, according to authorities, then hijacked a vehicle at gunpoint in Cambridge, telling the driver that they were the marathon bombers, a law enforcement source told CNN on condition of anonymity.

At some point, apparently at a gas station, that source said, the driver escaped.

Police, who were tracking the vehicle using its built-in GPS system, picked up the chase in Watertown. The pursuit went into a residential neighborhood, with the suspects throwing explosives at police.

A shootout erupted and ultimately one bomber — later identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev — got out of the car. Police shot him, and his brother ran over him as he drove away, according to the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Richard H. Donohue Jr., 33, a three-year veteran of the transit system police force, was shot and wounded in the incident and taken to a hospital, a transit police spokesman said Friday. The officer’s condition was not immediately known.

Another 15 police officers were treated for minor injuries sustained during the explosions and shootout, Jennifer Kovalich, a spokeswoman for St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center, said.

Suspects background

Police believe the brothers are the same men pictured in images released Thursday by the FBI as suspects in the marathon bombing that killed three people and wounded dozens on Monday.

The men are shown in the images walking together near the marathon finish line.

The first suspect — apparently Tamerlan Tsarnaev, according to authorities — appears in the images wearing a dark hat, sunglasses and a backpack. The second suspect, wearing a white cap, is the one who remains at large, police said.

But the mother of the Tsarnaev brothers refused to believe they were involved in the marathon bombings and subsequent shootout.

“It’s impossible for them to do such things. I am really telling you that this is a setup,” Zubeidat Tsarnaeva told state-run Russia Today from Dagestan.

“My son would never keep it in secret. …If there is anyone who would know it would be me. He wouldn’t hide it. But there was never a word.”

The brothers came from the Russian Caucasus region and moved to Kazakhstan at a young age before coming to the United States several years ago.

“My youngest was raised from 8 years in America. My oldest was really properly raised in our house. Nobody talked about terrorism,” their mother said.

The suspects’ parents recently returned to Dagestan in the Caucasus region after living in the United States for about 10 years because they were “nostalgic,” the father, Anzor Tsarnaev, told Russian state-run Zvezda TV.

He accused someone of framing his sons. “I don’t know who exactly did it. But someone did.”

A federal official told CNN that Dzhokar Tsarnaev came to the U.S. as a tourist with his family in the early 2000s and later asked for asylum. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 2012. Tamerlan Tsarnaev was not a naturalized citizen, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. He came “a few years later” and was lawfully in the United States as a green-card holder.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev had studied at Bunker Hill Community College and wanted to become an engineer, according to those who knew him. He then took a year off to train as a boxer.

‘I don’t understand them’

The official said that a posting on a social media site in the elder brother’s name included the comments: “I don’t have a single American friend. I don’t understand them.”

Dzhokar Tsarnaev attended Cambridge Rindge & Latin, a public high school, said Eric Mercado, who graduated a year behind the suspect. Mercado said Tsarnaev had worked at Harvard University as a lifeguard.

“We hung out; we partied; we were good high school friends,” Mercado told CNN.

“We’re all, like, in shock. We don’t really understand. There were no telltale signs of any kind of malicious behavior from Dzhokar. It’s all coming as a shock, really.”

Mercado said he lived a block away from the suspect and did not know his older brother.

Dzhokar Tsarnaev is currently registered as a student at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, which ordered its campus evacuated on Friday. The school is located 65 miles south of Cambridge, just west of New Bedford.

Larry Aaronson, Dzhokar Tsarnaev’s neighbor and a former teacher at the high school Tsarnaev attended, called him a “wonderful kid.”

“He was so grateful to be here, he was compassionate, he was caring, he was jovial,” Aaronson told CNN.

CNN’s Joe Johns, Chris Lawrence, Deborah Feyerick, Ben Brumfield, Terence Burke, Dave Alsup, Carma Hassan, Jake Tapper, Drew Griffin and Chandler Friedman contributed to this report.

(CNN) — [Updated 2:04 p.m. ET]

Connecticut State Police have issued an alert for another vehicle, saying a suspect in the Boston Marathon attack now could be in a 1999 green Honda Civic with Massachusetts license plate number 116 GC7. The CSP cited Boston authorities.

Connecticut police issued a similar alert earlier today for a different vehicle; that vehicle eventually was found unoccupied Friday in the Boston area, Boston police said.

[Updated 1:51 p.m. ET]

More details on the Tsarnaev brothers:

Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19, the Boston Marathon attack suspect now at large, came to the United States on July 1, 2002, at age 8 on a tourist visa, a federal source said. While here, he sought asylum and became a citizen on September 11, 2012.

His older brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was killed in a shootout with police overnight, came to the United States four years after his brother, on September 6, 2006, at the age of 20, the source said. He came legally but was not naturalized. He was a green card holder and in the country lawfully.

[Updated 1:23 p.m. ET]

Dzhokar Tsarnaev became a U.S. citizen on September 11, 2012, a federal official said Friday.

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