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Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 crashes at San Francisco International Airport

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Video from the scene posted on YouTube shows dark gray smoke rising from the aircraft. (Photo from CNN)

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Flight 214 Aftermath Photos

An in-depth review of the cockpit voice recorder of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 shows the crew called twice for a “go around,” an aborted landing, before crash landing at San Francisco International Airport.

(CNN) — A third person — identified only as a girl — has died from injuries sustained in last week’s crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214, officials at the San Francisco hospital where she was being treated said Friday.

San Francisco General spokeswoman Rachael Kagan identified the victim as a “minor girl” who had been in critical condition at the Bay Area hospital since last Saturday’s crash. The hospital didn’t release any information about the girl — including her name, exact age or ethnicity — who died Friday morning, according to Dr. Margaret Knudson, the hospital’s chief of surgery.

“It’s a very, very sad day today at San Francisco General Hospital,” said Dr. Geoffrey Manley, San Francisco General’s chief of neurosurgery. “We have all done everything we could.”

Two other people — both 16-year-old girls from China — were reported dead soon after the Boeing 777 crash landed at San Francisco International Airport.

One of those teenagers was hit on the runway by a fire truck, though it’s not clear if she was already dead when she was struck, San Francisco police spokesman Albie Esparza told CNN on Friday.

At the time, firefighters were using flame retardant that ended up surrounding areas immediately around the plane with foam, Esparza said.

“When the truck repositioned itself to get a better aim of the fuselage, they discovered the body of the victim in the fresh track from the path of the truck,” he added.

The foam was thick enough to cover a body, Esparza noted. Moreover, it is difficult for those in the “industrial-size” fire trucks that responded to crash to see things on the ground, the police spokesman said.

“Right now, we are waiting results from the coroner to determine if she died from the crash or the fire engine going over her,” the police spokesman said. “And that will be part of our investigations, like any other case, by our hit-and-run and major accidents investigations teams.”

Of the passengers and crew on board, 304 people survived — 123 of whom walked away relatively unscathed and 182 who were sent to hospitals, including the girl who died Friday.

A handful of them remained hospitalized Friday, including six patients at San Francisco General as of 3 p.m. (6 p.m. ET) Friday. That hospital’s figure include two adults in critical condition with spinal cord injuries, abdominal injuries, internal bleeding, road rash and fractures.

Besides the passengers and crew members’ physical recovery, San Francisco International Airport is working to get back to normal as well.

The airport was shut down to incoming and departing traffic for several hours after the Asiana crash, which occurred around 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Two of its four runways reopened later that day, but — as late as Friday — the runway around which the Boeing 777 finally settled was still closed.

That should change Sunday, when that third runway should reopen, airport director John Martin said late Thursday. This will follow repair and the removal of what’s left of the stricken aircraft, which began Friday.

Why did it crash? Investigators are still working to determine that, having sifted through the wreckage and interviewed many of those closest to the scene, including the flight’s four pilots and many of its flight attendants.

An in-depth review of the cockpit voice recorder shows two pilots called for the landing to be aborted before the plane hit a seawall and crashed onto the runway, the head of the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday.

The first internal call by one of the three pilots in the cockpit to abort the landing came three seconds before the crash and a second was made by another pilot 1.5 seconds before impact, NTSB chief Deborah Hersman said.

The agency has begun wrapping up its investigation at the airport and crews are cleaning up the debris left by the crash. Investigators turned the runway back over to the airport. The runway has been closed since Saturday’s crash.

The investigation is slowly shifting back to NTSB headquarters in Washington, where authorities will work to find a more definitive answer about what led to the crash.

The passenger jet’s main landing gear slammed into the seawall between the airport and San Francisco Bay, spinning the aircraft 360 degrees as it broke into pieces and eventually caught fire.

CNN’s Chelsea J. Carter, Augie Martin and Ed Payne contributed to this report.

Six days after Asiana Airlines flight 214 crashed in San Francisco it’s still dangerous to be around the debris. A fire broke out Friday morning as workers were cleaning up the mess. Firefighters quickly got it under control.

Meanwhile, the investigation continues. Now, investigators say that two of the three pilots in the cockpit called to abort the landing just seconds before the plane’s tail hit a seawall and broke off. The plane was going too slow to land safely, but the flight recorder didn’t show any discussion of the speed until just nine seconds before the crash.

Photo of Aftermath of Asiana Crash in SFO

The aftermath of Asiana Airlines flight 214 with 307 people on board, originated in Shanghai, China, and stopped in Seoul, South Korea. It was preparing to land in San Francisco when the rear of the plane struck the edge of the runway, severing the tail and causing the plane to erupt in smoke and flames.

SAN FRANCISCO (CNN) — Investigators looking into the fatal crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 are focusing on the crew and aircraft as they try to understand why the giant jet clipped the end of runway before crashing, the chairwoman of the National Transportation Safety Board said Monday.

“We’re certainly looking at the crew and how they operated, how they were trained, at their experience,” NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman told CNN’s “New Day.”

“We’re also looking at the aircraft. We’re looking to see if the crew was using automation or was flying on autopilot, or they were hand-flying the airplane,” she said.

Like many modern aircraft, the Boeing 777 is capable of landing automatically, but it was unclear if the plane’s computer was handling Saturday’s attempted landing or if it was being done by the pilot, who Asiana said was making his first San Francisco landing at the controls of that model of aircraft.

The plane was flying much slower than the recommended 137 knots (157 mph) as it approached the runway, and onboard systems warned the crew the plane was about to stall moments before the crash, according to the NTSB.

The flight, with 307 people on board, originated in Shanghai, China, and stopped in Seoul, South Korea. It was preparing to land Saturday in San Francisco when the rear of the plane struck the edge of the runway, severing the tail. Most passengers were able to escape before the plane erupted in smoke and flames.

Two people died, although the San Francisco Fire Department said one of those may have been run over by an emergency vehicle, San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault said.

The victims, teenagers Ye Mengyuan and Wang Linjia, were among 35 Chinese students headed to California to attend West Valley Christian School’s summer church camp, the school said on its website.

NTSB spokeswoman Kelly Nantel said the agency was aware of the reports that one of the girls may have died after being run over on the tarmac but did not have details.

The San Francisco Fire Department has not responded to CNN’s request for comment.

Pilot’s flight record

Lee Kang-kuk, the pilot who was in the captain’s seat of Flight 214, had flown from Seoul to San Francisco several times between 1999 and 2004, the airline said.

But Saturday marked his first time landing a Boeing 777 at San Francisco International Airport and was the ninth time he had flown the model, with 43 hours at the controls, the airline said. He has about 10,000 hours as a pilot, Asiana said.

Hersman, who has discouraged speculation about whether the crew bore responsibility for the crash, downplayed the significance of the pilot’s experience in her “New Day” interview.

“It’s not unusual for crew to change aircraft types,” she said. And with air crews flying all around the world, it’s not unusual for pilots to fly into unfamiliar airports for the first time either.

She said it’s important for the two pilots in charge of the aircraft during the “very risky” landing phase to work closely together, and while she said investigators have no evidence of cockpit communications problems, it’s something investigators will be looking at, she said.

Mary Schiavo, a former inspector general for the U.S. Department of Transportation, said video and other data related to the crash suggest the crew “lost situational awareness” while approaching the airport.

“They’re low and slow and that’s a problem,” Schiavo said.

All four pilots have been interviewed by NTSB and South Korean investigators, said Choi Jeong-ho, the head of South Korean’s Aviation Policy Bureau.

“We cannot reveal what’s been said as it is an ongoing investigation,” Choi said.

Hersman said that in most airplane crashes, investigators rarely find a single explanation for what went wrong.

“In most of our investigations, we find that it’s not just one thing, it really is a combination of factors that lead to an accident,” she said.

While weather has been ruled out as a factor, other factors officials are investigating include whether construction at the airport may have played a role, Hersman said Sunday.

Work to extend a runway safety area required the temporary shutdown of a system designed to help pilots land planes safely, she said.

Clues from voice recorder

The pilots apparently tried to speed up seven seconds before the crash, cockpit voice and flight data recorders showed.

A stall warning sounded three seconds later, telling the pilots the plane was about to lose its ability to stay in the air.

Then — just 1.5 seconds before the plane slammed into the runway — the crew decided to call off the landing and try to pull up for another try, Hersman said.

It was too late.

The frightening crash

With no warning from the cockpit, survivors said, the plane’s rear struck the sea wall at the end of the runway. The impact severed the plane’s tail and sent the rest of the body spinning on its belly.

Amateur video obtained exclusively by CNN shows the plane crashing and spinning counterclockwise and coming to a stop.

In addition to the two deaths, 182 people were hospitalized with injuries ranging from severe scrapes to paralysis.

“We’re lucky there hasn’t been a greater loss of life,” San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said.

A number of the injured passengers remained hospitalized Monday, including six in critical condition at San Francisco General Hospital, said Dr. Margaret Knudson, the hospital’s chief of surgery.

About half of those admitted to the hospital had spinal fractures, she said. Others have head trauma.

“Their recovery could be months and months and maybe not even to full recovery,” she said.

Many of the injured said they were sitting toward the rear of the aircraft, Knudson said.

But 123 of the 307 people on board walked away uninjured. Benjamin Levy was among them.

“Honestly, I was waiting for the plane to … start flipping upside down, in which case I think a lot of people would have not made it,” Levy said.

“If we flipped, none of us would be here to talk about it,” he said.

CNN’s Michael Pearson and Holly Yan reported and wrote from Atlanta; Mike Ahlers reported from San Francisco; CNN’s Chelsea J. Carter, Dan Simon, Dana Ford, Thom Patterson and Aaron Cooper contributed to this report.

Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 crashes

An Asiana Airlines’ Boeing 777 crashed and burned Saturday, July 6, 2013 while landing at San Francisco International Airport, sending up a large plume of dark smoke from the aircraft, which lost its tail and much of its roof to fire. A photo taken by Eunice Bird Rah’s father, who was on the flight, shows flames and smoke bursting out of many of the aircraft’s windows. Rah’s father knew something bad was coming, he told his daughter, telling her the plane was coming in too low and the pilot tried to raise it at the last minute. He “is doing fine, thank God,” Rah told CNN, indicating others appeared to be hurt. “It’s heartbreaking,” she said.

(CNN) — Two people were killed and 182 others taken to hospitals after an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport, sending up a huge fireball.

Here are the latest updates at a glance:

– Among the survivors of the Asiana Airlines crash are 26 Chinese middle school students on a summer camp trip, the Chinese consulate in San Francisco said.

PREVIOUSLY REPORTED

FLIGHT PATH

– The flight had originated in Shanghai.

– The plane was traveling from Incheon International Airport in Seoul to San Francisco — a 10-hour direct flight.

OCCUPANTS

– On board were 291 passengers and 16 flight crew members.

– All 307 have been accounted for.

–The 291 passengers included 61 Americans, 77 South Koreans, 141 Chinese and one Japanese, the airline said.

PILOTS

– Four pilots alternating in shifts operated the plane, Asiana Airlines said.

– The pilot flying the plane at the time of the crash was a veteran who had been flying for Asiana since 1996.

FATALITIES

– The two fatalities were found outside the plane, with San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White saying it was her understanding “that they were found on the runway.”

– Both were Chinese girls, in their mid-teens, said Yoon Young-doo, the airline’s CEO.

INJURIES

– 182 were taken to hospitals, some with severe injuries, others for a checkup.

– San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said that when crews arrived, “some of the passengers (were) coming out of the water. But the plane was certainly not in the water.”

“There was a fire on the plane, so the assumption might be that they went near the water’s edge, which is very shallow to maybe douse themselves with water,” she said.

CAUSE

– The plane was a Boeing 777-200 that was purchased in March 2006.

– “In my knowledge, there wasn’t any engine failure,” CEO Yoon Young-doo said. But, he said, he could not say whether the wheels or landing gear was functioning normally.

– While the exact cause of the crash will take months to determine, Choi Jeong-ho of the South Korean transport ministry said “the tail of the Asiana flight hit the runway and the aircraft veered to the left out of the runway.”

– There are no signs of terrorism related to the crash, a national security official told CNN.

– A National Transportation Safety Board team will investigate. The team will include people focused on operations; human performance; survival factors; airport operations; and aircraft systems, structure and power.

“We have not determined what the focus of this investigation is yet. … Everything is on the table at this point,” said NTSB chairwoman Deborah Hersman.

– South Korean aviation investigators and Asiana Airlines officials will also help in the investigation.

WEATHER

– There were a few clouds in the sky around the time of the crash, and temperatures were about 65 degrees. Winds were about 8 miles per hour.

ACCIDENT HISTORY

– Asiana had two fatal crashes and a several close calls

– In July 2011, a cargo plane slammed into the East China Sea, killing the only two people on board.

– In 1993, Asiana Airlines Boeing 737 went down in poor weather near South Korea’s Mokpo Airport, killing 68 of the 116 occupants on board.

AIRLINE RESPONSE

– “I bow my head and sincerely apologize for causing concern to the passengers, families and our people,” said Yoon Young-doo, the airline’s CEO.

CNN’s Chelsea J. Carter, Greg Botelho, Jason Hanna, Cameron Tankersley, Mike M. Ahlers, Sara Pratley, Rande Iaboni, K.J. Kwon, John King, Janet DiGiacomo, Kyung Lah and journalist Sohn Seo-hee contributed to this report.

(CNN) — Asiana Airlines Flight 214 was seconds away from landing when the passengers sensed something horribly amiss.

The plane was approaching San Francisco International Airport under a beautifully clear sky, but it was flying low. Dangerously low.

Benjamin Levy looked out the window from seat 30K and could see the water of the San Francisco Bay about 10 feet below.

“I don’t see any runway, I just see water,” Levy recalled.

Further back in the Boeing 777, Xu Das had the same realization.

“Looking through window, it looked on level of the (sea)wall along the runway,” he posted on Weibo, China’s equivalent of Twitter.

Then, with no warning to passengers, the plane slammed onto the edge of the runway, sheared off its tail and started spinning on its belly.

A massive fireball and clouds of smoke shot skyward. First responders rushed to the scene, and horrified onlookers at the airport terminal feared the worst.

Medics found the bodies of two Chinese girls in their mid-teens on the runway, next to the burning wreckage.

Remarkably, 305 others on the plane survived the crash Saturday morning.

Responders found some of them coming out of the water.

“There was a fire on the plane, so the assumption might be that they went near the water’s edge, which is very shallow, to maybe douse themselves with water,” said San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White.

While 182 of them were taken to hospitals with injuries ranging from spinal fractures to bumps and bruises, another 123 managed to escape unharmed.

Some jumped out; others slid down emergency chutes with luggage in hand.

“This could have been much worse,” San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee said.

A long flight

The crash ended an otherwise mundane flight that originated in Shanghai, China. It made a connection in Seoul, South Korea, before flying hours to San Francisco.

The 291 passengers included 141 Chinese, 77 South Koreans, 61 Americans and one Japanese, said Asiana Airlines. The airline is one of two major airlines in South Korea; the other is Korean Air.

At the helm of the plane was one of Asiana’s veteran pilots who had been flying for 17 years, the airline said Sunday. Three other pilots were also on board, working in shifts.

Exactly what caused the crash could take up to two years to determine, said Choi Jeong-ho, head of South Korea’s Aviation Policy Bureau.

South Korean investigators will work alongside officials from the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. Their first order of business: locating the plane’s voice and data recorders.

The airline purchased the plane, a Boeing 777-200, in March 2006. And Asiana CEO and President Yoon Young-doo said there was no engine failure, to his knowledge.

“The company will conduct an accurate analysis on the cause of this accident and take strong countermeasures for safe operation in the future with the lesson learned from this accident,” Yoon said.

The survivors

Many of those who survived the crash described chalked it to divine intervention.

“I think it’s miraculous that we have survived because things could have been much worse,” said passenger Vedpal Singh.

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer and author of the book “Lean In,” was supposed to be on Flight 2014. But she switched to a United flight, arriving about 20 minutes before the Asiana flight crashed.

“Serious moment to give thanks,” she wrote on her Facebook page.

Not the first time

Prior to Saturday’s disaster, Asiana Airlines endured two deadly crashes over the past 20 years.

In 1993, a crash near South Korea’s Mokpo Airport killed 68 of the 116 people on board. The Boeing 737-500 went down in poor weather as the plane was attempting its third landing, the Aviation Safety Network said.

And in 2011, a cargo plane headed from Seoul to Shanghai slammed into the East China Sea, killing the only two people on board.

Perhaps one of the reasons so many people survived Saturday’s crash was because the Boeing 777 is built so that everybody can get off the plane within 90 seconds, even if half the doors are inoperable.

Still, many questions linger.

Yoon, Asiana’s president and CEO, told reporters he could not confirm many details of the crash, pending the investigation.

But he started the press conference by bowing his head in apology.

CNN’s Diana Magnay, Mike M. Ahlers, Ben Brumfield, Joe Sterling, Rande Iaboni, K.J. Kwon, Kyung Lah, Amanda Watts, Janet DiGiacomo, Richard Quest, Seo Yoon-jung and Sohn Seo-hee contributed to this report.

(CNN) — Two people died as a result of Saturday’s crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco, and “upwards of approximately 60 people” are unaccounted for, San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White told reporters. About 130 people have been transported to hospitals, she said,

irpt:2532336-Update on SFO fire

The smoke billowing from the main runway at San Francisco Airport is now being cited as the reason for “the shutdown of the entire airport,” according to United Airlines employees. All flights arriving and departing from the airport have been halted.

(CNN) — A Boeing 777 bound from South Korea crashed Saturday upon landing at San Francisco International Airport, sending up a huge fireball and spinning before finally coming to a stop — having lost its tail and, eventually, much of its charred roof.

Asiana Airlines Flight 214 left Seoul’s Incheon International Airport earlier Saturday, according to FlightAware, a website that offers tracking services for private and commercial air traffic. An airline spokesman in Seoul told CNN that 291 passengers and 16 staff members were aboard.

At least 28 people hurt in the crash were being treated late Saturday afternoon at area hospitals — 15 at San Francisco General Hospital, five at Stanford Hospital, five at California Pacific Medical Center’s St. Luke’s Campus and three at St. Francis Memorial Hospital — hospital spokespeople said.

San Francisco General Hospital spokeswoman Rachel Kagan said that facility was expecting another 15 patients. At least 10 who were already in that hospital — eight adults and two children — were in critical condition. Tents have been set up outside the hospital’s emergency department.

The U.S. Coast Guard has transported one person to Stanford Hospital, said Corrine Gaines of the military branch.

Air traffic control audio — between the airport’s tower and Flight 214 crew members — suggested that those on the ground knew there was some sort of problem, promising that “emergency vehicles are responding.”

“We have everyone on their way,” the air traffic controller said, according to LiveATC.net, a website that provides air traffic control audio.

Anthony Castorani, who witnessed the flight land from a nearby hotel, said he saw the plane touch the ground then noticed a larger plume of white smoke.

“You heard a pop and you immediately saw a large, brief fireball that came from underneath the aircraft,” he told CNN.

Kristina Stapchuck saw the dramatic scene unfold from her seat on a plane on the airport tarmac. Soon after Flight 214 touched down, “it looked like the tires slipped a little bit and it rocked back,” she told CNN.

Parts of the plane began to break off as it rocked and then began to spin.

“It all happened so suddenly,” Stapchuck told CNN.

A photo provided to CNN by Eunice Bird Rah — and shot by her father, who was a passenger on the plane — shows flames and smoke bursting out of many of the aircraft’s windows.

Rah’s father knew something bad was coming, he told his daughter, telling her the plane was coming in too low and the pilot tried to raise it at the last minute. Rah said her father “is doing fine, thank God,” but noted that others appeared to be hurt.

Said Rah: “It’s heartbreaking.”

Video taken soon after the crash and posted on YouTube showed dark gray smoke rising from the plane, which appeared to be upright. That smoke later became white, even as fire crews continued to douse the plane.

CNN iReporter Timothy Clark was on an eighth-floor balcony of a nearby hotel when he heard the noise and saw a “dust cloud.”

“Then people running from the plane, then flames,” Clark said.

A photograph posted to Twitter shows what appear to be passengers walking off the plane, some of them toting bags, as smoke rises from the other side.

“I just crash landed at SFO,” read the accompanying message from David Eun. “Tail ripped off. Most everyone seems fine. I’m ok. Surreal…”

The top of the aircraft was charred and, in spots, gone entirely, according to video from CNN affiliate KTVU. The plane was on its belly, with no landing gear evident and the rear tail of the plane gone.

Debris settled from the water’s edge, along San Francisco Bay, up to where the plane eventually came to a stop.

Fire trucks were on site; first responders could be seen walking outside the aircraft.

Evacuation slides could be seen extending from one side of the aircraft, from which there was no apparent smoke.

According to Asiana Airlines, 141 of the passengers who were aboard Flight 214 are Chinese, 77 are South Korean and 61 are American.

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer and author of the book “Lean In,” was supposed to be one of them, she wrote on her Facebook page. But she’d switched instead to a United flight, arriving about 20 minutes before the Asiana flight crashed.

Flights diverted to other airports

The Bay Area airport was closed to incoming and departing traffic after the crash, the Federal Aviation Administration said on its website, adding that the time when it’s expected to reopen is unknown.

Flights destined for San Francisco’s airport — known by its call letters, SFO — were being diverted to airports in Oakland, Sacramento, San Jose and Los Angeles, said Francis Zamora from the San Francisco Department of Emergency Management.

In an official tweet around 3:30 p.m., San Francisco International Airport said that two of its runways had reopened.

The airport, located 12 miles south of downtown San Francisco, is California’s second busiest, behind LAX.

There were a few clouds in the sky around the time of the crash, and temperatures were about 65 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. Winds were about 8 miles per hour.

The National Transportation Safety Board is sending a “go team” that will be led by chairwoman Deborah Hersman to investigate the crash, the agency said. Boeing is “preparing to provide technical assistance” to investigators, company spokesman Miles Kotay said in a statement.

“We have not determined what the focus of this investigation is yet,” NTSB chairwoman Deborah Hersman said shortly before leaving Washington for San Francisco to lead her agency’s probe. “Everything is on the table at this point.”

There are no signs of terrorism related to the crash, a national security official told CNN. President Barack Obama was at Camp David when he learned about the crash, a senior White House official said.

Asiana Airlines — one of South Korea’s two major airlines, the other being Korean Air — is investigating the cause of the crash, a company spokesman told CNN.

The airline received the plane involved in the incident in 2006, according to the Aviation Safety Network. The aircraft has two Pratt & Whitney engines, it said.

Asiana operates many of its flights out of Incheon International Airport, which is the largest airport in South Korea and considered among the busiest in the world.

According to information on Asiana Airlines’ website, the company has 12 Boeing 777 planes. The airliners have a seating capacity of between 246 and 300 people and had a cruising speed of 555 mph (894 kph).

See more on this story on local CNN affliates KGO, KRON, KPIX and KTVU

CNN’s Mike M. Ahlers, Chelsea J. Carter, Rande Iaboni, K.J. Kwon, John King and Janet DiGiacomo contributed to this report.

(CNN) — An Asiana Airlines’ Boeing 777 crashed and burned Saturday while landing at San Francisco International Airport, sending up a large plume of dark smoke from the aircraft, which lost its tail and much of its roof.

Latest update:

– The National Transportation Safety Board has scheduled a news conference for 5:30 p.m. ET Saturday with NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman to discuss the crash landing of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport, the agency said. The news conference will take place in Washington prior to NTSB investigators’ departure for California.

Asiana Airliens 777 crashes at San Francisco International Airport

A Boeing 777 operated by Asiana Airlines crashed while landing Saturday, July 6, 2013 at San Francisco International Airport, an FAA spokesman told CNN. CNN iReporter Timothy Clark took this photo.

Previously reported:

– The U.S. Coast Guard has transported one person linked to Saturday’s plane crash at San Francisco International Airport to Stanford Hospital, said Corrine Gaines of the Coast Guard. She did not provide additional information on the patient’s status.

– Asiana Airlines is investigating the cause of the crash landing, an airline spokesman told CNN.

– There are no signs of terrorism related to the crash, a national security official told CNN.

– Flights into and out of San Francisco International Airport have been canceled following the crash, the FAA said Saturday on its website. It is not known when the airport operations will resume, the FAA said. A number of flights were diverted Saturday afternoon to Los Angeles International Airport, LAX officials said in a post to the airport’s official Twitter account.

– The National Transportation Safety Board is sending a “go team,” which will be led by chairwoman Deborah Hersman, to investigate the crash, the agency said.

– There were a few clouds in the sky around the time of the crash, and temperatures were about 65 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. Winds were about 8 miles per hour.

– A photograph posted to Twitter shows what appear to be passengers walking off the plane, some of them toting bags, as smoke rises from the other side.

– Kristina Stapchuck saw the dramatic scene unfold from her seat on a plane on the airport tarmac. Soon after Flight 214 touched down, “it looked like the tires slipped a little bit and it rocked back,” she told CNN. Parts of the plane began to break off as it rocked and then began to spin. “It all happened so suddenly,” Stapchuck said.

– Flight 214 left Seoul’s Incheon International Airport earlier Saturday and flew 10 hours and 23 minutes to California, according to FlightAware, a website that offers tracking services for private and commercial air traffic.

– Anthony Castorani, who saw the flight land from a nearby hotel, said he saw the plane touch the ground then noticed a larger plume of white smoke. “You heard a pop and you immediately saw a large, brief fireball that came from underneath the aircraft,” he told CNN. “It began to cartwheel.”

– The FAA identified the plane as Asiana Airlines Flight 214, en route from Seoul, South Korea.

– CNN’s Dana Bash, who was heading to the airport at the time of the crash, said she noticed smoke emanating from the runway. She said she had not noticed any arrivals or departures since the crash.

– Video from the scene posted on YouTube showed dark gray smoke rising from the plane, which appeared to be upright. Evacuation slides could be seen extending from one side of the aircraft, from which there was no apparent smoke.

Asiana Airliens 777 crashes at San Francisco International Airport

A Boeing 777 operated by Asiana Airlines crashed while landing Saturday at San Francisco International Airport, an FAA spokesman told CNN.

(CNN) — There is no sign that terrorism played a role in Saturday’s crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport, a national security official told CNN.

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