Conservationist Jane Goodall to discuss life’s work at Tulane lecture

Jane Goodall photo courtesy Jane Goodall Institute

NEW ORLEANS World-renowned ethologist and conservationist Jane Goodall will deliver a lecture on her life’s work Thursday, March 16, at Tulane University.

The lecture, including a Q and A, will take place from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Dixon Hall auditorium, followed by a book signing in Dixon Hall Room 118.

Goodall, 82, is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute — which is celebrating it’s 40th anniversary this year — and a UN Messenger of Peace. She is best known for her landmark study with the the wild chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, where she immersed herself in their habitat as neighbor rather than a distant observer.

Her discovery in 1960 that chimpanzees make and use tools rocked the scientific world and redefined the relationship between humans and animals. Today, she travels the world, speaking about the threats facing chimpanzees, environmental crises and her reasons for hope.

“We are so honored and excited to have Dr. Goodall addressing the Tulane community,” said Tulane anthropology professor and environmental studies director Katharine Jack. “While she is well known for her research on wild chimpanzees, it is her pioneering community-centered conservation programs that will perhaps resonate most strongly with Tulane students. “

Goodall is the recipient of dozens of awards and the author of numerous books, including Seed of Hope, which will be for sale at the lecture along with Me…Jane, a children’s book by Patrick McDonnell about a young Jane Goodall and her special childhood toy chimpanzee named Jubilee.

Goodall’s visit is being organized by the Tulane Center for Public Service, the Newcomb College Institute and professor Jack. The lecture is free and open to the public but tickets are required. Email cps@tulane.edu for tickets.