Birth control made easy? App allows women to get birth control without a doctor visit

390565 02: A woman holds prescription contraceptives June 13, 2001 in Seattle, Washington. A federal judge ruled on that Bartell Drug Co., which operates 50 drug stores in the Seattle region must pay for prescription contraceptives, like the birth control pills shown here, for its female employees. The class-action suit was brought against Bartell Drug Co. by Jennifer Erickson, a 27 year-old pharmacist with the company, and may lead employers across the country to do the same. (Photo by Tim Matsui/Getty Images)

390565 02: A woman holds prescription contraceptives June 13, 2001 in Seattle, Washington. A federal judge ruled on that Bartell Drug Co., which operates 50 drug stores in the Seattle region must pay for prescription contraceptives, like the birth control pills shown here, for its female employees. The class-action suit was brought against Bartell Drug Co. by Jennifer Erickson, a 27 year-old pharmacist with the company, and may lead employers across the country to do the same. (Photo by Tim Matsui/Getty Images)

NEW ORLEANS (WGNO) – Yes, there is an app for that.

There are some new apps and websites that prescribe women and teens birth control without ever stepping foot in a doctor’s office.

Those who use the apps say taking time out for a doctor’s visit can be stressful and time-consuming.

So how does the app work?

In most of the apps, the woman answers some questions about her health online or through video chat.

Then the woman is paired with a doctor who talks them through the service and sends the prescription to their local pharmacy.

Some even ship the birth control right to their front door.

These new websites and apps require no legislative approval since clinicians still write the prescriptions and need to follow the state laws for telemedicine.