Million dollar rare Pope bling!

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NEW ORLEANS (WGNO) - On this Easter Sunday, we take a look at some very rare religious treasures in New Orleans at MS Rau Antiques on Royal Street.

News with a Twist Reporter Kenny Lopez went to MS Rau Antiques to check out these magnificent items! These rare religious treasures were once worn by Pope Paul VI, and the cross originally belonged to Pope Pius XII.  When Pope Paul VI visited the United States in 1965 he gave the cross and ring to the United Nations to auction off with all the money going to help people in poverty.  They raised 64-thousand dollars, and now the jewels are worth 1.9 million dollars!

POPE PAUL VI's CROSS

  • The piece was a gift to the United Nations in 1965 from Pope Paul VI
  • He hoped that the proceeds from the sale of the cross would contribute to the UN's work
  • The cross originally belonged to Pope Pius XII and was a gift to Paul VI
  • Once owned by Pope Pius XII, Pope VI, United Nations, and daredevil Evel Kneival
  • Circa 1890-1900 7 long x 4 wide
  • 4" wide x 7" length, 18 carat gold with Colombian emeralds, 60 carats in gems, with Old European cut white diamonds including an 1.88 carat, a 7.75 carat, four 5-6 carat stones and numerous 3-4 carat stones.

POPE PAUL VI'S RING

  • A stunning 13.50-carat European cut diamond centers the opulent ring
  • The piece was a gift to the United Nations in 1965 from Pope Paul VI
  • The ring originally belonged to Pope Pius XII and was a gift to Paul VI
  • The ring features an exquisite Chi Ro engraving as well as inlaid diamonds and rubies on the shank
  • Once owned by Pope Pius XII, Pope Paul VI, the UN, and Evel Kneival
  • Circa 1920

Peter Hernandez, the Jewelry Sales Manager at MS Rau Antiques said they feel blessed to have this bling.  "People are just amazed to be able to see it, and touch it.  You're not going to find this unless you go to a museum or the Vatican itself,  Historically, this is a very important piece," he said.