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San Francisco crash: latest developments

(CNN) — An Asiana Airlines’ Boeing 777 crashed and burned Saturday while landing at San Francisco International Airport, sending up a large plume of dark smoke from the aircraft, which lost its tail and much of its roof.

Latest update:

– The National Transportation Safety Board has scheduled a news conference for 5:30 p.m. ET Saturday with NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman to discuss the crash landing of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport, the agency said. The news conference will take place in Washington prior to NTSB investigators’ departure for California.

Asiana Airliens 777 crashes at San Francisco International Airport

A Boeing 777 operated by Asiana Airlines crashed while landing Saturday, July 6, 2013 at San Francisco International Airport, an FAA spokesman told CNN. CNN iReporter Timothy Clark took this photo.

Previously reported:

– The U.S. Coast Guard has transported one person linked to Saturday’s plane crash at San Francisco International Airport to Stanford Hospital, said Corrine Gaines of the Coast Guard. She did not provide additional information on the patient’s status.

– Asiana Airlines is investigating the cause of the crash landing, an airline spokesman told CNN.

– There are no signs of terrorism related to the crash, a national security official told CNN.

– Flights into and out of San Francisco International Airport have been canceled following the crash, the FAA said Saturday on its website. It is not known when the airport operations will resume, the FAA said. A number of flights were diverted Saturday afternoon to Los Angeles International Airport, LAX officials said in a post to the airport’s official Twitter account.

– The National Transportation Safety Board is sending a “go team,” which will be led by chairwoman Deborah Hersman, to investigate the crash, the agency said.

– There were a few clouds in the sky around the time of the crash, and temperatures were about 65 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. Winds were about 8 miles per hour.

– A photograph posted to Twitter shows what appear to be passengers walking off the plane, some of them toting bags, as smoke rises from the other side.

– Kristina Stapchuck saw the dramatic scene unfold from her seat on a plane on the airport tarmac. Soon after Flight 214 touched down, “it looked like the tires slipped a little bit and it rocked back,” she told CNN. Parts of the plane began to break off as it rocked and then began to spin. “It all happened so suddenly,” Stapchuck said.

– Flight 214 left Seoul’s Incheon International Airport earlier Saturday and flew 10 hours and 23 minutes to California, according to FlightAware, a website that offers tracking services for private and commercial air traffic.

– Anthony Castorani, who saw the flight land from a nearby hotel, said he saw the plane touch the ground then noticed a larger plume of white smoke. “You heard a pop and you immediately saw a large, brief fireball that came from underneath the aircraft,” he told CNN. “It began to cartwheel.”

– The FAA identified the plane as Asiana Airlines Flight 214, en route from Seoul, South Korea.

– CNN’s Dana Bash, who was heading to the airport at the time of the crash, said she noticed smoke emanating from the runway. She said she had not noticed any arrivals or departures since the crash.

– Video from the scene posted on YouTube showed dark gray smoke rising from the plane, which appeared to be upright. Evacuation slides could be seen extending from one side of the aircraft, from which there was no apparent smoke.

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